Recently, as in yesterday, my position at LexBlog has taken a radical turn. Mostly, my job has consisted of mindlessly scrounging for websites without the slightest inclination into the quality of the presented blogs. I was desperate to add anything and everything to The List without very many concerns. It was a very cool process that let my geeky how-is-this-going-to-look mind run while completing a major task. However, that has all changed.

After looking at thousands, potentially hundreds of thousands of blogs, my job is now to read, mark, and decide what to do with each and every blog. I have become the first line of gatekeepers that decide whether or not a blog should be allowed to enter the kingdom of LexBlog. This job has become one of the coolest jobs on my varied resume.

I remember hearing years ago about jobs at major publishing companies. The students/recent college grads have large bins filled with books and manuscripts that they read and either throw away or send up the ladder. The bin was a hodgepodge of papers, letters, and other various materials in which authors placed their novels.  A book could be written on a roll of toilet paper, but if it was good, the gatekeeper would send it up. My job has mirrored this process quite well.

The process has slowed down considerably. Where I could easily scan and sift 10k+ websites a day, I can only email about 20-25 bloggers in the same amount of time. I get to read some amazing blogs. I have read stories of murder, slight, fraud, compassion, advocacy, intrigue, and so much more. The drama of life is reflected in these blogs and they don’t fail to entertain or inform. I have found that there are certain characteristics about law blogs that seems absent from other blog realms.

Law blogs ask: “What do we do with this?”. A story has an arc, also known as a state of change. The main character always goes through a series of events that have consequences. However, a good law blog will ask “So what? What do we do with this information?”. It’s not enough to just read the paper about a murderer on death row pleading innocence. I read a blog about the ethical complication about the murderer ignoring the lawyers legal advice that could save the client from death (still life in prison, but at least alive).

I read another blog about a lady forced to carry her 70 lb service dog in a crate into her condo, stairs included. She sued the condo association and the decision is still up in the air, but what a decision! Could you imagine hearing about a neighbor that was required to carry their dog in a crate while near the property? Some would say “that’s a sad story”. A lawyer would ask, “So, what should we do about this information?”

As I continue to explore all the neat and nifty blogs out there, I hope that each blogger knows my authenticity. I like them; therefore, they will hear from me. My only hope is that they can see the gatekeeper waving them in. Otherwise, they will continue to try and climb over the wall for readers to view them.